Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line






descargar 0.69 Mb.
títuloRsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line
página2/17
fecha de publicación17.03.2017
tamaño0.69 Mb.
tipoDocumentos
ley.exam-10.com > Derecho > Documentos
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

The Profit Imperative

Because maximizing return to shareholders is legally required of corporate officers, profit must be the ultimate measure of all corporate decisions. Profit necessarily takes precedence over community well-being, worker safety, public health, peace, environmental preservation and national security.

The primacy of profit over ethics may have moderately destructive impacts, as with Enron's manipulation of electricity markets to maximize profit on the backs of California citizens. In other instances, it can mean the deaths of many innocent people, as when Ford and Firestone executives continued selling a product combination that they knew was killing many of their customers, while withholding the danger from the public. Their decision stemmed from a “rational” cost-benefit analysis which indicated that settling lawsuits resulting from fatal accidents was less costly than a recall…

Consider this: the much-publicized financial fraud cases have occurred in (by far) the most highly scrutinized and regulated realm of corporate behaviour. What might be unearthed if we adequately staffed and funded investigations into other areas where the profit imperative has more serious consequences, such as violations of workplace safety or compliance with laws to keep our drinking water and air free of toxins?

The Growth Imperative

Corporations live or die by whether they grow. For a publicly-traded corporation, there is no such thing as “big enough”. The growth imperative fuels the corporate drive to continually pursue new resources and markets around the world. As natural resources are depleted, new frontiers continually are sought. The effects of this imperative are visible now, as more of the world's few remaining pristine places are targeted for commercial exploitation.

Corporate planners relentlessly lure “less-developed societies” into the global corporate economy to tap new sources of consumers and cheap labour while institutions like the World Trade Organization and International Monetary Fund supplement enticements with coercive power.

Corporations generate propaganda, claiming that global corporatization (promoted as “free trade”) raises living standards. But this story is contradicted by global economic data (documented extensively by the Center for Economic and Policy Research, which demonstrate that corporate colonialism -the siphoning of profit from the country or region of production-is having a debilitating impact on many developing countries.

Structural Amorality

Corporations are artificial creations, shielded from obligations of personal morality and responsibility by their very design. As a result, decisions that may be antithetical to community interests, workers’ welfare, or public and environmental health are made without risk of personal liability. Furthermore, having no real commitment to a particular locale, corporations can relocate easily to escape taxes, unionized employees, and environmental protection laws.

In light of growing public awareness and resistance to environmental and societal harm, more corporations are seeking to veil their amorality and appear altruistic. This practice of “greenwashing” is intended to coax more people to buy their products, services or stock, but if corporate benefits do not accrue, altruistic poses are dropped. For example, when Exxon Corporation executives realized that their spending to mitigate damage to Alaskan shores after the Valdez oil spill was not swaying public opinion enough to benefit the company's bottom line, they dropped the pretence of moral obligation and stopped the cleanup.

Quantification

Corporations require subjective values to be translated into objective quantities that are easily tallied on balance sheets. Forests, for example, are valued only in terms of “board feet”. Their immense value in sustaining life or providing clean water and spiritual nourishment goes uncounted. This carries over to government institutions that are heavily influenced by industry; hence the U.S. Forest Service considers trees worth thousands of dollars to timber companies as economically worthless unless they are cut down.

Such accounting without human values allows corporate cost/benefit analyses to be the measuring stick for many public health policies. The resulting policy of "risk-assessment" inflicts sickness and death from easily preventable pollution or toxic pesticides to avoid the “excessive” costs of healthier alternatives.

Corporate political powers succeeded in pushing Congress to effectively abandon the Precautionary Principle (addressing or preventing probable health hazards proactively, rather than waiting for definitive scientific proof of public harm) when it repealed the Delaney Amendment in 1996. Delaney simply required that our food be free of proven carcinogens.

Exploitation & Homogenization

Corporate profit depends not only on minimizing employee compensation but also on shifting costs created by business onto society as a whole, commonly called externalization. We all foot the bill for such externalized costs of pollution, illness, health care, public infrastructure to support corporate expansion and much more.

Corporate employees often are dehumanized-seen as replaceable parts in a machine. For managers in the corporate workplace, personal morality must not interfere with profit-based decision making, though these decisions often carry deep personal, community, or environmental consequences. A CEO who resists moving a factory overseas to evade environmental regulations or refuses to cut workers’ pay soon will be replaced if these actions result in an unexploited opportunity for profit.

Corporations have a tremendous stake in fostering homogeneous consumers and conformity. Consumption accelerates as more people believe that certain commodities bring material satisfaction. Inner satisfaction, self-sufficiency, and contentment in nature are subversive to corporate goals. As transnational chains increasingly dominate commerce, native societies are pressured to give up their traditional ways and join the corporate global culture-uniqueness is gradually vanquished.

Lack of Limitations

Our country's founders and many subsequent generations recognized the danger in allowing corporations to grow in size and power. Corporations initially were given a limited lifespan, barred from engaging in any activity not expressly permitted, and relegated to a narrow range of permissible actions. Corporations were deemed appropriate tools to serve a public benefit through engaging in commerce but were fully subordinate to democracy and prohibited from legally attempting to influence elections, education, public policy, and other realms of civic society.

But it's easy to forget lessons not learned through personal experience. For more than a century, we have permitted corporations to elude democratic control and escape our limitations on their lifespan, size, and activities. We have yielded to them immense power to weaken citizen sovereignty over business and to shape our laws and government.

As a result of vast political power, the majority of harms caused by corporations are perfectly legal, rendering even rigorous enforcement of the laws governing corporate actions inadequate. Banishing corporations from political participation is a necessary first step to reclaiming our democracy.

We must abandon the absurd notion that corporations can reform themselves. Such notions deceive and distract us from our fundamental work. This does not mean we should fail to support the efforts of those working to improve corporate actions from within; but merely asking for greater “corporate responsibility” makes little more sense than asking a bulldozer to act responsibly.

Eve “Business Ethics” magazine founder Marjorie Kelly now writes “it won't be enough to rely on voluntary initiatives, codes of conduct, enlightened leadership...we must change the fundamental governing framework for all corporations in law”.

It is “We the People” who must be responsible, as we have not been for over 100 years, and relegate corporations to their proper role -a tool for serving the public interest. Only by disillusioning ourselves can we hope to see the roots of our problems and recognize our responsibility: to restore our authority over corporations as citizens and re-program the machine”.

Final del formulario

Nuestro futuro por la borda - Cómo socavan el desarrollo los tratados de comercio e inversiones entre países ricos y pobres - Documento Informativo de Oxfam Internacional, publicado el 20/3/07.

http://www.oxfam.org/es/news/2007/pr070321_free_trade_agreements

“El sigiloso avance de los tratados de comercio e inversiones entre países ricos y pobres amenaza con negar a los países en desarrollo una posición favorable en la economía mundial. Estos acuerdos, liderados por Estados Unidos y la Unión europea, imponen normas cuyo alcance compromete seriamente las políticas que los países en desarrollo necesitan para luchar contra la pobreza.
Los países ricos están utilizando estos “Tratados de Libre Comercio” (TLC) y acuerdos sobre inversiones bilaterales y regionales para lograr concesiones que no son capaces de conseguir en la Organización Mundial del Comercio (OMC), donde los países en desarrollo pueden unirse y negociar una reglas más favorables. Estados Unidos llama a este enfoque “liberalización competitiva” y la Unión Europea expresa su intención de utilizar los acuerdos bilaterales como “los peldaños hacia futuros acuerdos multilaterales”.
El avance inexorable de estos tratados sobre comercio e inversiones, negociados en gran medida a puerta cerrada, amenaza con socavar la promesa de que el comercio y la globalización servirían como motores para reducir la pobreza. En un mundo cada vez más globalizado, estos acuerdos buscan beneficiar a los exportadores y a las empresas de los países ricos a expensas de agricultores y trabajadores pobres, con graves consecuencias para el medio ambiente y el desarrollo.
Lo peor de los acuerdos es que privan a los países en desarrollo de su capacidad de dirigir la economía nacional y proteger a sus ciudadanos más pobres. Al ir más allá de las disposiciones negociadas a nivel multilateral, imponen reglas de mayor alcance y difícil marcha atrás que desmantelan de manera sistemática las políticas nacionales de promoción del desarrollo.
EEUU y la UE están imponiendo reglas sobre propiedad intelectual que reducen el acceso de las personas pobres a medicinas que les salvarían la vida, aumentan los precios de las semillas y de otros insumos agrícolas poniéndolos fuera del alcance de los pequeños productores, y dificultan el acceso de las empresas de los países en desarrollo a las nuevas tecnologías.
Las reglas sobre liberalización de servicios contenidas en los TLC amenazan con dejar fuera de juego a las empresas locales, reducir la competitividad y aumentar el poder de monopolio de las grandes compañías. Estas nuevas reglas suponen también una posible amenaza para el acceso a los servicios esenciales.
Las nuevas reglas sobre inversiones contenidas en muchos tratados impiden a los gobiernos de los países en desarrollo exigir a las empresas extranjeras la transferencia de tecnología, la formación de los trabajadores locales o la adquisición local de insumos de producción. Con estas condiciones, las inversiones extranjeras no establecen vínculos con el país, no generan empleo de calidad, y no mejoran tampoco los salarios; sirviendo en cambio para agravar las desigualdades.
Los capítulos sobre inversiones de los TLC y los acuerdos bilaterales sobre inversiones abren la puerta a posibles demandas de compensación por parte de los inversores extranjeros en caso de que se promulguen nuevas leyes que se consideren perjudiciales para los intereses del inversor, incluso si han sido promulgadas por interés público.
Los tratados de libre comercio a menudo imponen una liberalización arancelaria acelerada, poniendo en peligro el medio de vida de los pequeños productores e impidiendo a los gobiernos el uso de políticas arancelarias para promover la producción.

Los TLC no abordan sin embargo, los efectos negativos que los subsidios en los países ricos tienen sobre los países pobres al generar prácticas desleales de “dumping”, ni abordan tampoco la plétora de barreras no arancelarias que siguen impidiendo a éstos el acceso a los mercados de los países ricos.
El efecto global de estos cambios en las reglas es el progresivo desmantelamiento de la gobernabilidad de la economía, transfiriendo poder de los gobiernos a las empresas multinacionales y privando a los países en desarrollo de las herramientas que necesitan para desarrollar sus economías y lograr una posición favorable en los mercados mundiales.
Aún cuando los gobiernos de los países en desarrollo se han mostrado cada vez más firmes en la OMC y en algunos acuerdos regionales y bilaterales, el equilibrio de poder en las actuales negociaciones sigue fuertemente sesgado a favor de los países ricos y las grandes e influyentes corporaciones”...
- Total, al fin, nada es cierto
Desde finales de los años 80, la mayoría de los países en desarrollo se han visto obligados, bajo las condiciones de los préstamos de las instituciones financieras internacionales, a abrir sus mercados a las importaciones y concentrar sus esfuerzos de desarrollo en productos que puedan vender en el exterior.

Pero lejos de mejorar su posición para exportar, esta política ha inundado de mercancías muchos mercados internacionales, lo que ha provocado una caída de los precios.
Bajo los actuales acuerdos comerciales, los campesinos pobres se enfrentan a la caída de los precios de sus cosechas, la disminución de la parte que reciben del precio final de los productos que venden, la competencia de los productos de los países ricos que inundan sus mercados a precios subsidiados, y la falta de un acceso significativo de sus propios productos a los mercados de esos países.
Cada uno de los países y regiones más ricos, especialmente Estados Unidos y Europa, presionan para lograr su propia negociación comercial con los países pobres. Hay tantas negociaciones comerciales en marcha que están creando un laberinto de convenios entremezclados y que aumentan los costes del comercio porque cada uno tiene sus propias reglas.
Están tratando de convencer a los países pobres de que estos acuerdos comerciales mejorarán las vidas de sus pueblos. Pero los tratados regionales están llenos de reglas trucadas que favorecen los intereses de los países ricos y las grandes empresas.

Los acuerdos bilaterales o regionales dividen a los países en desarrollo y minan la fuerza que pueden tener en la Organización Mundial del Comercio. Muchos acuerdos bilaterales o regionales ya firmados han destrozado las vidas de personas pobres.
Los países ricos limitan y controlan la cuota de mercado mundial de los países pobres mediante impuestos sobre los productos importados. Como resultado, muchos países pobres sólo pueden exportar productos sin tratar, crudos, los cuales generan muchos menos ingresos que si fueran productos elaborados o finales.

Por ejemplo, los países ricos compran algodón y cacao a un precio muy bajo y después venden productos elaborados a los mismos países que les vendieron las materias primas para producirlos, como ropas de marca y chocolate fino, quedándose con casi todos los beneficios. Al mismo tiempo, los países pobres reciben amenazas si no abren sus mercados a las exportaciones de los países ricos.
Según estimaciones de Oxfam International, si África, Asia Oriental, Asia Meridional y Latinoamérica aumentaran su cuota de exportaciones mundiales en un 1%, los beneficios generados sacarían de la pobreza a 128 millones de personas.
Los Acuerdos Comerciales Regionales entre países en igualdad de condiciones son beneficiosos para ambos. Pero si se dan entre una economía fuerte y otra débil, la fuerte siempre acaba dominando a la débil. Y los países más vulnerables se empobrecen irremediablemente.
Los actuales acuerdos regionales de libre comercio eliminan todas las barreras al comercio. Esto supone que a las economías más débiles no se les permite utilizar aranceles para proteger sus industrias todavía crecientes y a sus agricultores. Antes o después, los agricultores más pobres terminan siendo desplazados por las importaciones baratas y las industrias nacientes se desarticulan porque no pueden competir con las empresas de los países desarrollados.
Incluso antes de la suspensión de las negociaciones de la OMC, tanto Estados Unidos como la Unión europea estaban persiguiendo sus propios intereses y buscando aceleradamente nuevos acuerdos regionales. El número de los acuerdos regionales sigue creciendo exponencialmente: actualmente están negociándose más de 300. En muchos casos, estos acuerdos tratan de negociarse a una velocidad poco razonable, evitando en muchos casos que los países más pobres tengan el tiempo y el espacio necesarios para desplegar sus propias agendas de desarrollo.
Las compañías más poderosas del mundo presionan a los países ricos para que endurezcan las leyes sobre las patentes de diferentes productos esenciales como semillas, medicamentos, libros de texto y software. El alto precio impuesto hace que muchos de estos productos estén fuera del alcance de la mayoría de la población. Un buen ejemplo es el acceso a los medicamentos.
Según Oxfam Internacional, cada año, las enfermedades infecciosas matan a 11 millones de personas en los países empobrecidos, lo que equivale a 30.000 muertes diarias. Muchos mueren porque son pobres y no pueden pagar el alto coste de las medicinas esenciales.

El incremento en la protección de las patentes por parte de las empresas cuesta a los países empobrecidos 40.000 millones de dólares cada año.
La globalización ha permitido a muchas personas acceder a un trabajo remunerado…

Algunas compañías cumplen unos estándares laborales mínimos…

Pero la exigencia de trabajar más rápido y más barato degrada estos estándares…

... empeorando las condiciones laborales para millones de personas.
El 70% de la ropa de bajo coste se hace en países donde no hay garantías de que se respeten los derechos básicos de los trabajadores y trabajadoras que la realizan. Sometidos a jornadas interminables, se les prohíbe asociarse para defender sus derechos y, además, ganan salarios paupérrimos.
La principal víctima de esta situación es la mujer, que representa entre el 75 y el 90% de la fuerza de trabajo que corta y cose la ropa que nosotros vestimos. Tres de cada 5 trabajadoras de la confección, al menos 15 millones de mujeres, trabajan sin contrato ni cobertura social de ningún tipo. Cobran 10 céntimos por hora en Bangladesh, 30 céntimos en China y Bulgaria, y 70 céntimos en Marruecos. La “carrera” de las empresas por abaratar costes parece no tener límites y contribuye a agravar esta situación.
- El “CATO” sobre el tejado de zinc caliente (Un “provocador” ejercicio de “cinismo”. La “hipocresía” llevada al “sarcasmo”… ¿En el Nombre del Hijo?)
(Cato Institute: Libertad individual, gobierno limitado, mercados libres y paz) (sic)
Salud y medio ambiente: Mitos y realidades, por Kendra Okonski y Juan Carlos Hidalgo

Kendra Okonski es Directora del Proyecto de Desarrollo Sustentable de la Internacional Policy Network, en Londres, Reino Unido. Juan Carlos Hidalgo es analista de políticas públicas y ex editor de elcato.org. Este ensayo (1) es la introducción del libro Salud y Medio Ambiente: Mitos y Realidades (International Policy Network, 2005), editado por ambos.

(1) La versión completa se puede encontrar en:
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

similar:

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconEn el mundo avanzado, la educación es el primer camino para desarrollar...

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconEsta Constitución ecológica tiene dentro del ordenamiento colombiano...

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconTÍtulo de la práctica: película “una verdad incomoda” y relación...

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconComo lo son el derecho a la calidad de vida, a un medio ambiente...

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconEs la introducción de sustancias en un medio que provocan que este...
«Superfund», donde se incluye una lista de los agentes contaminantes más peligrosos

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconDe Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre
«América para los americanos» sustituyéndola por esta otra: (América para los americanos del Norte).[1]

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconX el derecho económico como instrumento para mejorar la calidad de vida

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconObjetivo. Que el alumno aprenda acerca de la calidad de vida y el...

Rsc puede enfocarse a mejorar: a) la calidad de vida laboral; b) el medio ambiente; c) la comunidad donde está instalada la empresa; d) el marketing para desarrollar una comercialización responsable; e) la ética empresarial”… (De Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre) Triple Botton line iconResumen: El cuidado del medio ambiente, es una cuestión de cultura,...






© 2015
contactos
ley.exam-10.com